NEWS

In 19 states, the World Bank will provide $700 million for teenage females’ education.

In 19 states, the World Bank will provide $700 million for teenage females’ education.

Shubham Chaudhuri, the national director for Nigeria at the World Bank, announced that the organization planned to invest $700 million in the education of teenage girls throughout 19 states in Nigeria.

He revealed this on Monday in Abuja at a parliamentary conference on accelerating Nigeria’s demographic transition, which was organized by the National Population Commission, the House of Representatives, and the Office of the Speaker with support from the World Bank.

He claimed that the World Bank was committed to helping Nigeria empower young people and girls and that doing so would aid in the country’s demographic transformation.

He stated, “The key in some respects is to make sure that the girl-child stays in school in order to enable Nigeria to realize its demographic dividend. For adolescent girls, we have already contributed $500 million in financing and are about to add another $700 million in consensual funding. In Nigeria, it has increased from 7 to 19 states.

“Keeping adolescent girls in school is the main goal. 
It concerns the provision of maternal, child, and reproductive health services as part of primary healthcare. 
The government will need to assist with all of these.
In addition, Chaudhuri revealed that Nigeria had the lowest public spending and revenue levels in the entire world, stating that states would require more funding in order to provide basic services to their own citizens.
“Nigeria has the lowest level of public spending in the entire globe,” he declared. 
11, 12 percent of GDP is insufficient to support the fundamental services that any state owes to its citizens. 
fundamental infrastructure, primary healthcare, investing in its people, and maintaining law and order.

“Part of the reason that’s not there, is because Nigeria has the lowest level of revenues. A big part of that is there isn’t trust among citizens, and if citizens pay taxes the states will not use it properly.

See also  APC member passes away in Jos during the presidential campaign flag-off

“The National Assembly can play such an important role to ensure accountability. To ensure that every fund or resource that gets past them to the states is used directly to translate into services for ordinary Nigerians.

maintaining girls in school, particularly in these fundamental areas. There are 5,000 towns in Nigeria where there is no junior secondary school nearby. Would you take your adolescent daughter to a distant school where she might be kidnapped? How will Nigeria pay for an extra 5,000 schools to ensure that adolescent girls continue their education?

Femi Gbajabiamila, Speaker of the House of Representatives, said it was urgent to speed up Nigeria’s demographic change by giving young people jobs, access to primary healthcare, and keeping teenage girls in school.

Harnessing the demographic dividend in Nigeria would not be automatic, according to Nasir Isa-Kwarra, the chairman of the National Population Commission. Instead, each country would need to meet a number of requirements, starting with “a rapid and speedy fertility decline, holistically to permit sufficient demographic transition for economic transformation to occur.”

Achieving this achievement, he claimed, “would permit the formation of a population age-structure that hosts fewer dependents’ (for Nigeria of the young), but with a big cohort of productive/working age population that will breed wealth.

“This accomplishment can only happen, if Nigeria makes the right choices now in adopting targeted sound social policies and interventions in key sectors (education, health, women empowerment, job creation/productive and decent employment), guided by good governance that is built on strong and responsive institutional structure.”

See also  In Ogun, a man beats his wife to death over property ownership.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button